RESTORE failure – error 3633… ‘DeleteTree’ … ‘fulltext.cpp’

Here’s a little bit of the pain that I’m facing today.

I was trying a SQL Server RESTORE (using Quest’s Litespeed for SQL Server) of one of our databases, one that has a fulltext index. The restore was consistently failing with the following error message:

Msg 62301, Level 16, State 1, Line 0
SQL Server has returned a failure message to LiteSpeed for SQL Server which has prevented the operation from succeeding.
The following message is not a LiteSpeed for SQL Server message. Please refer to SQL Server books online or Microsoft technical support for a solution:
RESTORE DATABASE is terminating abnormally.
The file "sysft_CallLog_FullText" failed to initialize correctly. Examine the error logs for more details.

I had a look through the EventLogs, as suggested, and found this in the Application Log at the right time:

2013-04-04 08:57:45.85 spid53 Error: 3633, Severity: 16, State: 1.
2013-04-04 08:57:45.85 spid53 The operating system returned the error '32(error not found)' while attempting 'DeleteTree' on 'K:\MSSQL\FTData\CallLog_FullText\MssearchCatalogDir' at 'fulltext.cpp'(1747).

Running Sysinternals HANDLE to see what else was poking round that directory that would prevent it from being deleted gives the following:

Handle v3.5
Copyright (C) 1997-2012 Mark Russinovich
Sysinternals - http://www.sysinternals.com
pdrai.exe pid: 9208 type: File 3C8: K:\MSSQL\FTData\CallLog_FullText\MssearchCatalogDir

pdrai.exe? That’s a new one on me. Turns out that the support boys have installed PureDisk (from Symantec’s NetBackup division or acquisition – it’s easy to lose track), and the pdrai.exe program is the backup agent.

Now to have a word with them about this. There’s no way it should require a handle to be held for 6 hours (or more) to backup a mere 4MB of data.  I’ll let you know if I find out how to prevent this sort of thing. I may be some time.

addendum

Some time later, the Ops boys said that I was OK to kill the pdrai.exe task if it was doing this…

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